Mastering social media turbulence: How to weather change on social media  

We find ourselves in the teenage years of the dominant social media platforms – Facebook is 19 years old; Instagram is 13; and 17-year-old Twitter has gone and done the most 17-year-old thing possible, angrily changing its name to X. As with any teenager, volatility is the norm. Recent years brought us the mountainous rise of TikTok, the faltering of Twitter, the birth of Threads, the rise and fall of the metaverse, Bill C-18, Apple’s app tracking transparency, and generative AI for all. It’s been a lot. 

Then again, constant change is the fabric of the digital landscape and disruption is the whole point. So how do marketers navigate these rapid transformations of technology, norms, and tastes? You have two choices – radical change every quarter or create a long-term, stable social strategy. One is going to consistently get you into trouble, the other will set you up for success for years to come.     

Here’s a fundamental truth – just because platforms are volatile, doesn’t mean brands have to be. Amidst the chaos, we need to create integrated strategies that bring together social, creative, media, and web teams to curate moments, and create wholesome, ownable content focused on measurable business goals. Below are some ways to build a stable social strategy that will keep you grounded amidst teenage upheaval and increase brand value over time.

If users don’t win, everyone loses 

We are in a fierce battle for attention. Consumer ability to jump toward shiny new platforms is forever shifting how social media properties operate.  As marketers, we should be rooting for more success, not failure. A healthy, competitive social media ecosystem is better for all of us. Create ads that add value for users and platforms, avoiding out-of-touch and socially disconnected content.   

Meta’s platforms, along with TikTok’s, increasingly suffer from a proliferation of out-of-touch and socially disconnected advertisements. A surge in poorly crafted ads results in user disengagement; they post less frequently, see less of what they want, and before you know it, you’re in a platform death spiral. X is losing active users at double digit rates, and the platform’s most active users are tweeting (xeeting?) less and less. This cycle creates a worse environment for users, contributing to declining diversity, doom-scrolling, and deteriorating mental health – which is a lousy environment for brand advertising. And the platforms know this – X, Meta, and TikTok are each currently piloting new subscription, pay-for-use models.   

Marketers shouldn’t add to this deterioration. We must be thoughtful about what we bring to the party. Audiences want to be seen and acknowledged, and they crave relevant information. Brands who lead with authenticity and demonstrate that they understand the diversity of their customers’ values will continue to flourish.

Paid and organic: BFFs 

Organic reach is dead. But that doesn’t mean organic efforts should be abandoned. It just means that paid campaigns and organic publishing shouldn’t operate as distinct tactics, and certainly not only within distinct teams.   

So, bring organic and paid into the same strategy conversation – with creative, media, and social expertise at the table. Paid and organic can complement each other strongly. Organic audiences are engaged supporters, driving content views, comments, and organic website sessions. Organic content nurtures and informs those who know your brand. These audiences are your best customers, and insights from their actions and interests will inform your paid audience targeting, and your next round of creative content planning. On the flip side, within your best performing social media ad content – that’s tested across millions of targeted impressions, and dozens AI powered creative treatments – lies the spark for your next most engaging organic content.

Bigger! Better! Fewer! 

Organic reach is dead. But that doesn’t mean organic efforts should be abandoned. It just means that paid campaigns and organic publishing shouldn’t operate as distinct tactics, and certainly not only within distinct teams.   

So, bring organic and paid into the same strategy conversation – with creative, media, and social expertise at the table. Paid and organic can complement each other strongly. Organic audiences are engaged supporters, driving content views, comments, and organic website sessions. Organic content nurtures and informs those who know your brand. These audiences are your best customers, and insights from their actions and interests will inform your paid audience targeting, and your next round of creative content planning. On the flip side, within your best performing social media ad content – that’s tested across millions of targeted impressions, and dozens AI powered creative treatments – lies the spark for your next most engaging organic content.

Embrace platform formats 

Organic reach is dead. But that doesn’t mean organic efforts should be abandoned. It just means that paid campaigns and organic publishing shouldn’t operate as distinct tactics, and certainly not only within distinct teams.   

So, bring organic and paid into the same strategy conversation – with creative, media, and social expertise at the table. Paid and organic can complement each other strongly. Organic audiences are engaged supporters, driving content views, comments, and organic website sessions. Organic content nurtures and informs those who know your brand. These audiences are your best customers, and insights from their actions and interests will inform your paid audience targeting, and your next round of creative content planning. On the flip side, within your best performing social media ad content – that’s tested across millions of targeted impressions, and dozens AI powered creative treatments – lies the spark for your next most engaging organic content.

About the author

Matthew Stradiotto
Senior Vice President, Social Media

Matthew is a digital leader, brand strategist, and North American influencer engagement pioneer, with over 22 years of agency experience. He was recently Vice President & General Manager, Digital at Argyle, and a co-founder of Matchstick, one of Canada’s leading boutique agencies specializing in social media marketing and digital brand engagement.